The Best Brazilian Coffee for us.

Which is the best Brazilian coffee for us? We hugely highlight Central São Paulo, with that type of bolder and clearly defined beverage.

Best Brazilian CoffeeThe usual best tasting coffee in the opinion of most so-called experts is the one grown in South Minas Gerais and east Mogiana and are ranked of higher taste.

Fortunately, for the sake of diversion, some people, like me, dissent from that evaluation and classify as best Brazilian coffee products from other outstanding production regions in Brazil.

Some of us prefer stronger, yet not acid, coffees that are produced in the central-west region of São Paulo State, around Garça, the city where I live to the ones I just mentioned above.

Do neighboring feelings cloud my judgment? Well, could be. But I’m not a natural born citizen, and that should count for a bit of impartiality on my side.

Anyhow, people should not take only third party opinions on matters of taste. Taste is a very personal issue and should be tested and proven individually. Find out which is your Best Brazilian Coffee.

Best Brazilian CoffeeSo, if you happen to get a hold of some of our best commercial Brazilian coffee brands, please try it. The worst thing that could happen is that you will find it a bit bold and maybe won’t want to choose it frequently, but I guarantee that you won’t think it as a bad choice of coffee either.

You may also come across some Brazilian gourmet coffee. Those, in my opinion, are the best coffee in the world. Those are a bit more expensive, but, for a greater number of people every day, completely worth it. Those that put quality above budget will find great satisfaction from gourmet Brazilian coffee.

In case you are wondering the difference between gourmet and commercial coffees, this article tries to explain it briefly.

 

Garça has been an important coffee center for the last 90 years and participated vigorously in the second coffee cycle in the 60’s and 70’s.

During those days, almost every plantable inch of ground around Garça, Bauru and Marília were covered with coffee. Garça was the zenith producer of these best great tasting Joes.

During the 80’s, Brazil suffered a major economic crisis, and Garça lost a significant part of its coffee fields. Nevertheless, the activity is still imperative to us and, since then, our economy has diversified.

That event helped, on the other hand, to improve the quality of the coffee produced in the region since only the best and most careful producers were the ones that stepped out from the shadows.

 

We have articles for different types of Brazilian Coffee. Commercial x Gourmet Coffee Definition is a great source of information, if you are interested.

Have you ever wondered how we began to drink coffee? Check out the article,
History of Coffee Timeline.

 

Please leave a comment about The Best Brazilian Coffee.

18 thoughts on “The Best Brazilian Coffee for us.

  • 2016-04-22 at 1:55 pm
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    Great site!
    I love coffee.
    I also like the products that are visible on your site.
    They really look like something coffee lovers would love to buy!
    You provide very interesting information about the best Brazilian coffee. 🙂
    Which is the best place for coffee drinking in Brazil?

    Reply
    • 2016-04-23 at 7:42 am
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      Hello, Syed,

      Thank you so much for your words. The Best Coffee Places in Brazil will be a matter for a post, but between you and me, I can forward a hint. In São Paulo, Coffee Lab at Vila Madalena; In Rio de Janeiro, Confeitaria Colombo, a 120-year-old coffee and tea house.

      Cheers!

      Reply
  • 2016-04-25 at 10:15 am
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    When talking about Brazilian coffee’s I shared your opinion of making a more stronger cup, bold and flavorful cup. When I’m in a mood for Brazilian bean I notice that the Dry processed coffes tend to be more juicy and bold than the clean Wet processed ones. What do you think about that matter. Also what kind of method of brewing you use? Cause a a espresso machine will surely help vs the drip coffee version. Also I do my own roasted coffee, so I buy the coffee bean green to ensure freshness. Do you roast your own coffee?

    Reply
    • 2016-04-25 at 10:41 am
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      Hello, Mike,

      Thanks for stopping by and sharing your experienced impressions. They are a great asset.

      I tend not to compare espresso with drip brewing because I find them, almost as, different types of beverage. I usually prefer dip-brewed in the morning and early afternoon, leaving espresso for the rest of the day.

      Living in a coffee production area makes it really easy to find local (farmer friends) freshly roasted and ground coffees, but I have to confess, I have a thing for the supermarket Pilao brand. I think it’s a morning childhood memory “trauma”. haha.

      I drink a lot of coffee all day at different places and, the opportunity to taste just roasted and ground coffees happens lot of times. No argument that the latter is the best option for both drip and espresso.

      Best Regards and hope to you around more times.

      Reply
  • 2016-05-11 at 2:32 pm
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    For the health buffs out there, The Brazilian Journal of Infectious Diseases produced an article stating that coffee has he patoprotective benefits in Brazilian patients with chronic hepatitis C even in lower consumption than in American and European population.

    Reply
    • 2016-05-11 at 6:42 pm
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      Hello, Juan,

      Thank you for stopping by and leaving such valuable and important information. That certainly deserves research and an article. You are more than welcome to come back anytime and enrich our blog.

      Cheers!

      Reply
  • 2016-05-26 at 11:05 pm
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    Cool info about Brazilian coffee! As much as I love coffee, I don’t think I’ve ever tried Brazilian before. But after reading this post and finding out it’s fairly strong, I will have to try it. My family has always drank stronger coffee than average, so when I have any other coffee it tastes diluted. Next grocery store trip, I’ll keep my eye out for coffee from Brazil!

    Reply
    • 2016-05-28 at 12:04 am
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      Hello, Morgan,

      As you can see on this article, we produce many types of coffee here in Brazil.

      Usually is not the type plant or soil, or place that counts for making a coffee stronger or not. taste changes for bolder and more noticeable taste, but what makes a bif difference is the roast. Darker roasts tend to be stronger and more bitter.

      I suggest you try all types of Brazilian coffe you lay your hands on. See which suits you better.

      I also have a tip for you, in case you don’t have a strong coffee available. If you brewing method allows, try doubling the amount of coffee powder. From there, you should be able to experiment and figure out what ratio is better for that brand and roast.

      Thanks for stopping by.

      Cheers!

      Reply
  • 2016-06-28 at 9:35 am
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    Very interesting article on Brazilian coffee. Living in the Northeast US, I mostly see Colombian coffee in the bigger coffeehouses, but the smaller ones will have them from different places, including Brazil. I’ll have to pay more attention the next time I purchase coffee and see if I can find a Brazilian gourmet coffee.

    Reply
    • 2016-06-29 at 8:39 am
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      Hello, Kevin,

      Thank you for stopping by and sharing you impressions. Yes, the Colombians do have a better organized marketing strategy that has been on for decades. And, I have to admit, their coffee is the second best in the world… 😛

      Cheers!

      Reply
  • 2016-07-12 at 8:43 pm
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    Hi there. Wow, Coffee. I remember when i first started drinking it. At the beginning i couldn’t stand the taste even though I loved the smell. The smell would bring me in but then when I’d taste I’d be thrown back. Eventually after some time I got used to it. Now I just can’t stop drinking the stuff. Always looking for different coffees out there, thanks.

    Reply
    • 2016-07-13 at 9:58 am
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      Hello, Adam,

      Thanks for sharing your experience.

      Cheers!

      Reply
  • 2016-08-05 at 5:20 pm
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    I love great coffee as does my husband and we are always on the hunt for new types to try from different regions of the world. It looks like Brazil will be our next stop!!! Can you tell me–do they use pesticides on the coffee in Brazil? Is it shade grown? Thank you for the post.

    Reply
    • 2016-08-11 at 9:16 am
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      Hello, Hillary,

      Thanks for sharing your thoughts.

      We have farmers that use both, or either, Organic and Traditional methods of coffee growing. The proportion is similar to other organic/non-organic farming ratio. So, you can expect a smaller number of organic farmers here. Something similar happens with shade growing here, and the method is still very new (but spreading) in Brazil.

      Cheers!

      Reply
  • 2016-08-28 at 11:27 pm
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    Wow! I just learned so much about Brazilian coffee!
    It makes me want to make a cup right now but at 10:22pm, that’s probably not a good idea! I’ve had the Melitta brand before but never realized it was Brazilian. Good stuff! I love my coffee strong and bold! As a bartender, I really appreciate your coffee recipes. I’m going to put some of those to go use! Thank you!

    Reply
    • 2016-09-01 at 5:12 pm
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      Hello, Cat,

      I’m very proud to see that a professional from the gastronomic business had such kind words to share with us. I hope you come back to share your opinion again.

      Cheers!

      Reply
  • 2016-09-30 at 11:32 am
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    I love my cup of coffee on a morning.

    The problem is that I live in England so I am very far away from the production source in South America. This usually means that I have to make do with the usually brands such as Starbucks and Costa.

    I would absolutely love to try some of this less known “designer coffee”. I always prefer to consume stuff that is a product of small businesses rather than huge corporations. I always think the product is better.

    Could you give me a quick cost estimate for this stuff to be shipped to England?

    All the best!

    Reply
    • 2016-10-04 at 6:18 pm
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      Hello, Mark.

      It’s not easy for me to find the total cost for you. My first choice is Amazon, if you don’t have any local roaster that sells our coffee. I browsed Amazon UK and found out that the Brazilian coffee they sell there is may starts at around 9L/500g. I’m not able to find out about the postage prices but a quick look will be easy for you. Here is the link:

      https://www.amazon.co.uk/s/ref=sr_st_relevanceblender?keywords=brazilian+coffee&rh=i:aps,k:brazilian+coffee&qid=1475615815&sort=relevanceblender

      Cheers!

      Reply

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