Methods of Coffee Brewing

When it comes to Methods of Coffee Brewing, there are a few different forms to infuse your Joe with fantastic tasting results! Check it out!

Here is a list of the many coffee brewing methods we could find so far. The ones that are marked with links will lead to their respective articles or articles with similar information.

arabic-coffee1Arabic Method

Known as “mud coffee,” this “ancient process requires an extremely fine powder to prevent us from swallowing grounds. Those must sink to the bottom of the cup before we drink the beverage.

Filtered Brewing

Filtered coffee, drip, or pour-over brewing is a process which comprises passing water through roasted, ground coffee beans. A filter is used to separate the brewed liquid from powder.gator-coffee-hand-drip-2

 

farberware classic percolatorCoffee Percolators

A percolator is a kind of vessel used for an intricate brewing by regularly cycling the hot mixture within the grounds using convection to reach the required strength.

 

sterling french coffee pressFrench Presses

The process starts by putting ground coffee in an empty cup. Add hot water and cover to brew. Then press a plunger to separate the solids from the brew.

 

Vacuum Brewer

The system works using a very simple physics principle called Thermodynamics that allows the mixture to flow through a filter between two glass chambers.

 

Moka Pot Brewing

moka-pot1The “macchinetta” is a coffee maker that brews by passing steaming through ground coffee up through a tube and into a top chamber.
This is my preferred system that is not an “automatic machine”.

 

Espresso

reliable-coffee 250pxThis method of brewing forces by pressure a small amount of almost steaming water through finely ground coffee beans and a filter.

 

Brewing Machines

BrewStation-48464Most electric machines try to automatize the traditional coffee brewing methods.

 

Cold Brewing

Also called cold water extract, this method, which is not iced-coffee, works by submerging grounds in cool water for some time until it forms a concentrate.

 

We are working hard to complete articles for all the options above.

If you have knowledge of any brewing that we are not aware of, please, leave a comment on the discussion area of this page and we will research it.

31 thoughts on “Methods of Coffee Brewing

  • 2016-06-28 at 10:39 am
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    You have such helpful information in your article about methods of brewing coffee. I have learned new things about brewing from reading it. Can you tell me about mud coffee? Once the coffee is consumed, do you dispose of the “mud” I am just keen to know this. Thank you for your article.

    Reply
    • 2016-06-28 at 10:52 am
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      Hello, Rodney,

      Thank you for sharing your opinion. It is funny that you asked because, actually, in Arabic-culture regions (even abroad) many women tell people’s fortune by reading the mud that is left over in the bottom of the demiglass. And, yes, they dispose the mud after drinking the coffee (and fortune telling, haha).

      Cheers!

      Reply
  • 2016-06-28 at 10:41 am
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    As I love coffee I found your post on methods of coffee brewing really interesting. Most of these methods of coffee brewing I don’t actually like. The two I do really like are the Moka Pot Brewing method and the Espresso method. Definitely my two preferred methods.

    I’ve never tried the Vacuum Brewing method, but it looks really cool!

    Reply
    • 2016-06-28 at 12:01 pm
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      Hello, Darren,

      Thank you for sharing your opinion. If you watch the videos on these articles, Coffee Vacuum Brewer, or Best Vacuum Coffee Brewer, you will be able to see how cool it is. Many café have them and you can order one to try.

      I love Moka Pot, but then again, who doesn’t? To me it is even better than espresso since it keeps the oils in brew for an extra flavor.

      Cheers!

      Reply
  • 2016-06-28 at 10:45 am
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    Oh how I love coffee, but I have to keep myself very disciplined because I don’t like being addicted to it, so I drink it once or twice a week only.
    I wont have coffee in my house, that’d be lethal I’d never stop drinking it!
    Usually, I go to a cafe and have an Americano, which for those who don’t know its an espresso with a little water. Espresso is definitely my thing, especially when I’ve a migraine.

    Reply
    • 2016-06-28 at 11:52 am
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      Hello, Sharon,

      Thank you so much for sharing your opinion. I totally lack that discipline and am a complete coffee freak! haha

      Cheers!

      Reply
  • 2016-06-28 at 11:14 am
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    I really enjoyed all the different aspects of origin of coffee! Being an avid coffee drinker for many years, I had no idea about the history of coffee and really enjoyed reading about it! As well as the different ways coffee is prepared, so for me those two topics are some information that we’re very intresting to me! Your site itself looked very nice and was very informative and easy to maneuver and understand. I enjoyed the read and the education.Nice job

    Reply
    • 2016-06-28 at 11:38 am
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      Hello, Bob,

      Thank you so much for stopping by and leaving your opinion.

      Cheers!

      Reply
  • 2016-07-08 at 3:38 pm
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    Great article, I really did not know there are so many methods of brewing coffee. I’ve only seen a couple of them and tasted a few. I know the automatic machines are easily used but sometimes we prefer the old fashioned method. You mentioned that the Moka Pot Brewing is your favorite method, why is that? Better flavor?
    Thanks for the info!
    All the best!

    Reply
    • 2016-07-11 at 8:15 am
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      Hello, Ninene,

      Thank you for sharing. Yes, my Bialetti Moka Pot provides fantastic flavor.

      Cheers

      Reply
  • 2016-07-12 at 8:29 am
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    Hi,
    I have historically loved my machinetta for ages until I was introduced to an Aeropress a little while ago. Now that is my preferred method for simple good tasting coffee that is quick and easy too.
    Will you do a review on the Aeropress? It really is my favourite.
    Thanks very much, Kris

    Reply
    • 2016-07-12 at 1:51 pm
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      Hi, Cris,

      Thank you so much for you suggestion. I’m putting it on my to-do list as of now.

      Cheers!

      Reply
  • 2016-07-22 at 1:01 pm
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    I didn’t realize the possibilities for brewing coffee at home. I tend to stick to my Mr. Coffee Pot and coffee grounds at home! I leave it to the chains to make coffee using the other methods. I did try the French Press once, but I did not like the taste it produced. You wrote an interesting article.

    Reply
    • 2016-07-23 at 5:38 pm
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      Hello, Calvin,

      Thanks for sharing your coffee experience with us and for your kind words.

      It’s all good. As long as you are satisfied with your brewster, no one has the right to say anything about it, right? Just one question, though: Did you let the coffee brew boil? (not good)

      Cheers!

      Reply
  • 2016-07-22 at 1:04 pm
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    Good article on brewing coffee, I never knew there were so many options available. I do not consume coffee but I have a family of coffee drinkers who would love to read this article so sharing it with them now.

    What is the best coffee to give a coffee drinker as a gift, I am considering this as a gift for Xmas this year.

    Reply
    • 2016-07-24 at 8:32 am
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      Hello, there,

      Thanks for coming back. I suggest that you find a price range and, added to the above, read this article Commercial x Gourmet Coffee Definition from which you will find links that will help you a lot. Try to discover what type of brewing and coffee the people you are giving presents like.

      Cheers!

      Reply
  • 2016-08-11 at 11:17 am
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    Hey there!

    I am really surprised that there are several methods of coffee brewing as you manifest in this fantastic article.

    I’m loving the Colombian coffee. My favorite.

    Do you think you can apply the same coffee brewing method to any type of the product? Or your recommendations are only for the Brazilian coffee?

    renan

    Reply
    • 2016-08-15 at 11:12 am
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      Hello, Renan,

      Yes, you can apply all coffee brewing methods to any coffee. The difference will only be related to grinding. Some need coarser grinds, some need finer.

      Thanks for sharing your thoughts.

      Cheers!

      Reply
  • 2016-08-11 at 11:19 am
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    mmmmm….Caffeine fix! I literally consume at least 10 cuppas a day, unfortunately its just Jacobs and not the ‘good stuff’, i actually dont know much about coffee but i did have a friend that brought over coffee from Israel, he actually used a normal drinking glass and put two scoops of his ‘good stuff’ and when i took my last sip i had a mouth full of the ground coffee….he forgot to mention that you should leave a little in the cup hahaha….i would love to buy myself a proper coffee grinder and educate myself on the ‘good stuff’.

    Reply
    • 2016-08-13 at 11:52 am
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      Hello, Kerry,

      Thanks for sharing your daily grind (or not) impressions.

      Cheers!

      Reply
  • 2016-08-24 at 3:32 pm
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    I love coffee and am always looking for different brewing methods. I recently purchased a Moka pot and really like that, however I am having difficulty keeping the bottom chamber clean. It seems to be getting rust spots and overall is no longer the nice silver color it us and I am convinced that it is making the coffee taste funny.

    Do you have any tips for preventing this? I am drying the chamber with a dish towel, but it still looks discolored and smells odd.

    I keep hearing more about the cold brew method and really want to give this a try. Can I use the coffee that I use for my automatic coffee machine?

    Reply
    • 2016-08-29 at 7:22 am
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      Hello, Simone,

      I have never felt any side effect from the metal-humidity stains in my Moka pot. If they really bother you, try drying the unit very carefully after washing it and avoid letting you rest in the washing machine after it turns off.

      Some people say you need coarser grounds (ease of filtering) for cold brewing, but other than this, you should be fine. Keep in mind that others prefer the opposite for a faster result, but filtering will need more attention.

      Thanks for sharing your impressions.

      Have a nice coffee day!

      Reply
  • 2016-09-06 at 8:57 am
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    Hi there my friend,

    Great article explaining the different methods of brewing a cuppa Joe. I never actually knew there were a variety of ways to making a simple coffee.

    Which of these methods mentioned produces the best fullest flavour and which the best strength wise and caffeine kick ?

    Reply
    • 2016-09-10 at 7:23 am
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      Hello, Derek,

      My preferred methods are the Moka pot, drip brewing, and espresso. I dip brew lighter so I can drink more and that for me works pretty well. Regarding caffeine. Espresso is more concentrated in caffeine per ounce. Other methods have more caffeine per cup, since you usually drink larger cups.

      Thanks for sharing your experience.

      Cheers!

      Reply
  • 2016-09-25 at 3:43 pm
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    Hello again! Your site has some great info, which is why I like reading and commenting. After I read your post on espresso, I commented that I prefer a french press when making a regular cup of coffee. I think it’s superior to maintaining the quality of the coffee grinds and provides a more robust flavor of coffee versus a brewing machine, for example. Plus, a french press is so easy to use!

    Reply
    • 2016-09-29 at 11:26 am
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      Hello, there,

      Aren’t they awesome? hanks for sharing your experience. I look forward to seeing you around. Cheers!

      Reply
  • 2016-10-21 at 1:09 pm
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    I did not really so there were so many different ways to brew coffee! The only thing I don’t like, is to get grinds in my coffee, so I don’t think the Arabic method would be for me. Seems I am going to get some form of powder or grinds while drinking. I prefer, to get a medium blend, not too strong like in an expresso.

    Reply
    • 2016-10-22 at 11:03 am
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      Hello, there,

      Haha. I must agree with you. If you don’t like solids in your coffee avoid it then. Even done with extreme care, you will get a tiny bit them in it. I like Arabic, but, in reality, it is not for everyone.

      Espresso, in my opinion, is almost a different kind of beverage when compared to other types of brewing. I love them all, but, I prefer, non-paper filter drip brewing.

      Thanks for sharing. Cheers!

      Reply
  • 2017-01-11 at 2:28 pm
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    Excellent guide on different brewing methods. I can’t say I have tried them all! Obviously I am big espresso fan. But I grew up on French press coffee.

    I have tried many different coffees from many parts of the world and it always amazes me how the different brewing effects the flavor so dramatically.

    Reply
    • 2017-01-15 at 1:55 pm
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      Hello, Steve,

      I grew up on manual pour over coffee with cloth filters, the most popular brewing system until the 1960’s in Brazil. After the 1970’s Melitta introduced their paper filter brewing method in our country and an almost total shift happened. and 90’sand drip coffee machines came in the 80’s.

      Agree with you, those different ways of making coffee do varied and enjoyable tastes.

      Thanks for sharing your opinion and kind words. Cheers!

      Reply
  • 2017-07-01 at 9:53 am
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    Interesting read Netto. l never knew there were so many methods of making coffee beside our usual…. put coffee into a cup and pour hot water. l am enticed by the Moka pot and will be happy to grab one. Keep up the good work.

    Reply
    • 2017-07-07 at 8:34 am
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      I was surprised by it when I started researching about coffee too. A curiosity: most people in my country, even coffee farmers don’t know about them either. So, I guess we are not alone. Cheers!

      Reply

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